Lost Gem: “Lo and Behold” Early James Taylor

Photo Courtesy of Warner Bros.

Everyone’s talking ‘bout the gospel story

Some shall sink and some shall rise

Everyone’s worried ‘bout the train to glory

Long, long time ‘till it gets here to you, baby.

-- James Taylor, “Lo and Behold” ©EMI Blackwood Music, Inc.

Late last year, Warner Brothers issued remasters of singer-songwriter James Taylor’s albums from the early to mid-1970s, which propelled me delightfully into a rabbit hole of his music. While I had owned all of these records at the time they were originally released, and remember fondly when James ushered us into the “sensitive singer-songwriter” era, I frankly had forgotten that, early in his career, James’ music was still heavily influenced by the country, gospel and soul that he heard on the radio during his childhood in North Carolina.

A case in point is the lost gem “Lo and Behold,” a Taylor original from his debut Warners album in 1970.

Everyone’s talking ‘bout the gospel story

Some shall sink and some shall rise

Everyone’s worried ‘bout the train to glory

Long, long time ‘till it gets here to you, baby.

-- James Taylor, “Lo and Behold” ©EMI Blackwood Music, Inc.

Late last year, Warner Brothers issued remasters of singer-songwriter James Taylor’s albums from the early to mid-1970s, which propelled me delightfully into a rabbit hole of his music. While I had owned all of these records at the time they were originally released, and remember fondly when James ushered us into the “sensitive singer-songwriter” era, I frankly had forgotten that, early in his career, James’ music was still heavily influenced by the country, gospel and soul that he heard on the radio during his childhood in North Carolina.

A case in point is the lost gem “Lo and Behold,” a Taylor original from his debut Warners album in 1970.

Accompanying himself on guitar, Taylor delivers a powerful and bluesy gospel chant full of mystery and Christian imagery.  While Taylor is much better known today for the introspective, soft rock of the 1970s, his musical roots run much deeper and wider. Enjoy.

By Robb Patryk

 

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