Bonnie Pointer dies at age 69

Bonnie Pointer in 1974
By Nationaal Archief, Den Haag, Rijksfotoarchief: Fotocollectie Algemeen Nederlands Fotopersbureau (ANEFO), 1945-1989 - negatiefstroken zwart/wit, nummer toegang 2.24.01.05, bestanddeelnummer 927-4783 - Nationaal Archief, CC0, Link

(June 8, 2020) We are very sad to report that Bonnie Pointer, member of the iconic group The Pointer Sisters has died at age 69. The Pointers were of the truly original acts of the 70s and 80s, with their own sense of style and song that made them stand out and be noticed.

Bonnie and youngest sister June began singing together as teenagers and in 1969 the duo co-founded The Pointers (otherwise known as The Pair). After Anita joined the duo that same year, they changed their name to The Pointer Sisters and recorded several singles for Atlantic Records between 1971 and 1972. In December 1972, they recruited oldest sister Ruth and released their debut album as The Pointer Sisters in 1973. Their self-titled debut yielded the hit "Yes We Can Can." Between 1973 and 1977, the Pointers' donned 1940s fashions and sang in a style reminiscent of The Andrews Sisters; they also melded the sounds of R&B, funk, rock and roll, gospel, country and soul.

(June 8, 2020) We are very sad to report that Bonnie Pointer, member of the iconic group The Pointer Sisters has died at age 69. The Pointers were of the truly original acts of the 70s and 80s, with their own sense of style and song that made them stand out and be noticed.

Bonnie and youngest sister June began singing together as teenagers and in 1969 the duo co-founded The Pointers (otherwise known as The Pair). After Anita joined the duo that same year, they changed their name to The Pointer Sisters and recorded several singles for Atlantic Records between 1971 and 1972. In December 1972, they recruited oldest sister Ruth and released their debut album as The Pointer Sisters in 1973. Their self-titled debut yielded the hit "Yes We Can Can." Between 1973 and 1977, the Pointers' donned 1940s fashions and sang in a style reminiscent of The Andrews Sisters; they also melded the sounds of R&B, funk, rock and roll, gospel, country and soul.

Anita and Bonnie wrote the group's crossover country hit, "Fairytale," in 1974, which also became a Top 20 pop hit and won the group their first Grammy for Best Vocal by a Duo or Group, Country. Anita and Bonnie also were nominated for Best Country Song at the same ceremony. In 1977, Bonnie left the group to begin a solo career. The remaining sisters continued scoring hits from the late 1970s to the mid-1980s and had a major breakthrough with their 1983 album Break Out.

In 1978, Bonnie signed a solo with Motown, and released "Heaven Must Have Sent You," which reached No. 11 on Billboard Hot 100 chart. She released three solo albums, including two self-titled albums for Motown, before retiring from the studio. She came out of retirement to release Like a Picasso independently in 2010.

She still continued to perform, and reunited with her sisters on two separate occasions: when the group received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1994, and during a Las Vegas performance in 1996 singing "Jump (for My Love)".

This is a sad loss for the music world, and for fans who dug the truly unique, fun talent that Bonnie Pointer and her sisters brought. Bonnie is survived by brothers Aaron and Fritz, and sisters Ruth and Anita. She will be missed.

Portions of this article licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article  Bonnie Pointer

 

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